Wednesday, October 30, 2013

The Catacombs of War

German trench line system around Soissons, Western Front February 1915, pictured by Albert Dawson. Natural caves were converted to dug outs to fortify the German lines.


Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Infantry Charge Western Front, 1915

German infantry charge on the Western Front, captured by Albert Dawson in 1915. Both his film footage and a still picture of this scene is reproduced in the book Shooting The Great War, now available on Amazon.com


German Taube in Flight

Nicknamed "the Dove", this German World War I fighter plane was photographed by Dawson in 1915. A lucky shot, he captured this spectacular scene at the exact moment when the plane flew above him. The picture ended up on the cover of the New York Times War Pictorial.


Saturday, October 26, 2013

Movie scene: The Spade Brigade

Scene from Dawson's war film "The Battle and Fall of Przemysl": Austrian engineers moving up to the firing line at dawn.


Thursday, October 24, 2013

Book on Dawson now available

Starting October 21, 2013, the new book on Albert Dawson and his remarkable experiences as a cinematographer during World War I is available on Amazon, both in the USA and in the United Kingdom and Germany. The book will also be made available for bookstores throughout the United States.

Check out this link for more:


http://tinyurl.com/netze8q

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Film scene Dawson on Eastern Front

Watch Albert Dawson online at the website of the Imperial War Museum in London.

This clip shows him inspecting the ruined forts of Przemysl in June 1915. Rows of Russian soldiers were shot dead by Austrian machine guns around Fort no. 10.

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/1060023359

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Cover Shooting the Great War


Foreword by Kevin Brownlow

The new book on World War I cinematographer Albert K. Dawson, soon to be available on Amazon.com, will have a foreword by Kevin Brownlow. His magnificent book "The War, the West and the Wilderness" made us realize the unresearched weath of research opportunities into this subject. Thank you, Kevin, for your valuable support to this project!